Tag: 2018

Mini eARC Review: Ride On by Gwen Cole

Mini eARC Review: Ride On by Gwen Cole

In the near post-apocalyptic future, the skies are always gray and people are constantly searching for the sun. Partial synopsis provided by Goodreads. Ride On Author: Gwen Cole Publication Date: May 22, 2018 Publisher: Sky Pony Press Page Count: 280 Format: eARC Genre: Young Adult, […]

Blog Tour & Author Interview: Beyond the Moon by R.J. Wood

Blog Tour & Author Interview: Beyond the Moon by R.J. Wood

Beyond the Moon The Voyages of Jake Flynn #2 By R.J. Wood This is my stop during the blog tour for Beyond the Moon by R.J. Wood. This tour is organized by Lola’s Blog Tours. The blog tour runs from 11 till 24 June. See […]

Guest Post by PoetryBooksYA: Book Events’ Diversity and FOMO Issues

Guest Post by PoetryBooksYA: Book Events’ Diversity and FOMO Issues

Hello, everyone!

Today I have Danielle from PoetryBooksYA on my blog discussing her thoughts on diversity at book events. I’ll let her take it from here!

Speaking only from my experience, I wanted to discuss my thoughts on how I feel about seeing so much drama on book event FOMO (fear of missing out) and their diversity issues.

On one hand, I’ve never felt jealous of the book content creators who do attend these events. In fact, I’m a fan of a lot of the Booktubers who go because it gives me a chance to see from their perspective on what they did, who they were with, which authors they went to check out. It doesnt do me any harm to see how they chose to spend their weekend or week-long vacation.

On the other hand, I do think that specific book events like BEA (Book Expo America) and BookCon have a bit of a diversity problem that needs to be addressed. As a young, black female book blogger, I feel like I don’t have a proper space for things like BEA and BookCon because they’re not catered to me. They’re mostly catered to the white, cishet (cisgender/heterosexual) book content creators who invest their time to go every year. That’s why we see the same faces attending; there’s little to no growth in expanding the audience level. They’ve already shown that they hustled hard for their craft and have the privilege to go. But can they say the same for underprivileged creators? Black creators? Disabled? LGBT? I don’t think so. The book community has taken a step forward in wanting to read more diversely. However, it has taken five steps back by not expanding their brands to be more inclusive, and not exclusive.

I’ve never felt the desperate need to go to any book events, even ones that are local to me. I dont have the time or money to be fake around people who would just ignore or avoid me, and the friends i do have, theyre not diehard book fans like that, so I’d probably feel alone in my hyped up feelings. Also, these overhyped events seem fun for a minute but get exhausting later lol. It’s like Disney World; hyped so much, but once you get there, you want go back home, so whats the point?! I’d rather form my sense of community with the community online in my own way, rather than be too out in the open with people I barely know at an event that I barely know. These big events are an added bonus, not an absolute need.

Danielle @ Poetrybooksya

Thank you to Sheila for letting me guest post on her awesome blog! Follow me on @poetrybooksya on most social media platforms, and let’s discuss.

Now let's hear your thoughts!
Leave them in the comments below :

eARC Review: The Oddling Prince by Nancy Springer

eARC Review: The Oddling Prince by Nancy Springer

In the ancient moors of Scotland, the king of Calidon lies on his deathbed, cursed by a ring that cannot be removed from his finger. When a mysterious fey stranger appears to save the king, he also carries a secret that could tear the royal […]

Down The TBR Hole #5

Down The TBR Hole #5

Wow, a week has already come and gone. Time to take another look at my looming TBR. This challenge/meme was started by Lost In A Story back in 2016. Here are the rules, in case you are interested in participating too! Rules: Go to your goodreads to-read […]

Personal Update & April Wrap-Up

Personal Update & April Wrap-Up

I wanted to give a bit of a personal update on what to expect in the next few months on this blog.

I’ve mentioned here and there that I am expecting a baby (now in two weeks–which is crazy). Because of prepping for his arrival, as well as having family visit from overseas (and work), I’ve been incredibly busy, and have really struggled with keeping up with daily blogging. I decided for my sake that I need to back off for a while with some book-related commitments. Unfortunately, there isn’t enough time in the day to get everything done that I need to. And, well, my family comes before blogging. 

Anyways, for the months of May, June, and probably well into July, you may not see me posting as often as normal. While I deeply wish I could, I also won’t be able to blog hop and stay on top of what everyone else will be up to, which makes me very sad. To any of you fellow bloggers who continue to support my blog even when I haven’t been able to reciprocate, I am deeply grateful for your support and commitment! It means the world to me! Once things get into a routine, I should have time to get more involved again. 

Until then, my Thursday Blog Trots will be on hold, along with some Top 5 Wednesday posts. The month of May was a free-for-all month with T5W, and I just didn’t have time to make my own prompts. Therefore, you won’t be seeing any of those until June (possibly.) 

With all of that being said, here’s a rather uneventful wrap-up for the month of April!

What I Read & Reviewed

What I Read But Still Need To Review

  • Secondborn by Amy A. Bartol (tentative 2.5 stars)
  • Traitor Born by Amy A. Bartol (tentative 3 stars)

Catch-Up Reviews Written

Top 5 Wednesday Meme

Thursday Blog Trot Meme / Around the Blogosphere

Fairy Tale Friday Meme

Down The TBR Hole

Other Noteable Posts

Beat The Backlist Reading Challenge

In April, I contributed a total of 31 points for the Story Sorcerers team. (AND WE WON!)

PopSugar Challenge

Nada de nada. 🙁

Goodreads Reading Challenge

So, my Goodreads challenge has suffered. I had originally aimed to read 200 books this year, but it called for me to finish a book every two days, and I just couldn’t keep up. I ended up lowering my goal to 100 because it didn’t cause me anxiety to look at it like 200 did. I’m hoping I can still reach 200, but this year may be too eventful to get there. 

#ARCsAnonymous Goodreads Group Challenge

Due to the chosen challenge topic, I didn’t participate in the #ARCsAnonymous challenge in April. 

Well, there's my unsuccessful month.
How did you do on your reading challenges in April?
Where there any goals that you had to lessen or give up on completely? (I sure hope not!)

eARC Review: No Less Days by Amanda G. Stevens

eARC Review: No Less Days by Amanda G. Stevens

David Galloway can’t die. Partial synopsis provided by Goodreads. No Less Days Author: Amanda G. Stevens Publication Date: May 1, 2018 Publisher: Shiloh Run Press Page Count: 320 Format: eARC Genre: Christian Fiction, Speculative Fiction Cover Artist: — My Rating: ★★★ What happens to a […]

eARC Mini Review: Song of Blood & Stone by L. Penelope

eARC Mini Review: Song of Blood & Stone by L. Penelope

Release Day, May 1, 2018! In the beginning, there was silence. Partial synopsis provided by Goodreads. Song of Blood & Stone Series: Earthsinger Chronicles #1Author: L. PenelopePublication Date: May 1, 2018Publisher: St. Martin’s PressPage Count: 384Format: eARCGenre: Young Adult, Fantasy, RomanceCover Artist: —My Rating: Since […]

eARC Review: Sky In The Deep by Adrienne Young

eARC Review: Sky In The Deep by Adrienne Young

Release Day April 24, 2018!

OND ELDR. BREATHE FIRE.

Partial synopsis provided by Goodreads.

Sky In The Deep

Author: Adrienne Young
Publication Date: April 24, 2018
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Page Count: 352
Format: eARC
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Cover Artist: ---
My Rating: ★★★½

Eeyln is no stranger to battle. She’s been trained her entire life to defend herself, her family, and her clan against their rivals; the Riki. The Riki and Aska clans meet in battle every five years–a bloody tradition which began with the gods Thora and Sigr themselves. Each time, the battle claims many lives–including Eelyn’s brother, Iri. 

Or so she thought.

In the midst of yet another skirmish with the RIki, Eelyn happens upon her deceased brother. Thinking the Aska god, Sigr, sent her his spirit to defend her, everyone concludes that Eelyn was in Sigr’s favor. Eelyn, however, thinks otherwise. Unable to let the thought go that her long-lost brother may actually still be alive, Eelyn stalks the Riki, only to discover a painful truth. Not only that, but she is captured and taken as a slave by the Riki.

Unable to cope with the newfound knowledge that Iri still lives, but lives and fights with the enemy, Eelyn must discover empathy within herself in order to understand how her brother could end up across enemy lines. Through her own trials, Eelyn realizes that life isn’t always as it seems, and life can change within the blink of an eye.

Sky in the DeepSky in the Deep by Adrienne Young
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

All included quotes have been taken from an ARC and may not match the finished publication.

For a story with such a simple plot, Sky In The Deep still had a way of grabbing my attention. When I say simple, I mean that there aren’t numerous elements to remember, info dumps of world-building, or a multitude of characters to get to know. I also mean “simple” in a sense that there really is only one or two main focuses for the characters throughout the entire story. Because Sky In The Deep wasn’t overwhelmingly complex, it was easy to follow, direct, and made for a quick, yet engaging read.

I will say that I had hoped for more of the fantasy aspect to kick in (because this is considered to be a fantasy and not historical fiction) but it still had an interesting plot. The characters are the key and central focus and are what drives the story forward.

World Building

Not a large amount of detail is given on the actual location that this story takes place. The landscape shifts from a common battlefield between the fjords and the hills/mountains where the two warring tribes of the Aska and Riki reside. The climate resembles that of Northern European territory. A heavy winter season is present for the majority, if not all, of the story, and works against the main character at times. Basic political systems rule the tribes present in Sky In The Deep. Resembling an “eye for an eye” mentality, if someone wrongs another, it’s up to the people involved to settle the matter–as shone with Fiske and Thorpe.

This is supposed to be a Viking-influenced story. Considering that fact and historical evidence, the Viking age was between 800 – 1066 AD, so this is probably around the time frame that this plot is set. The lifestyles of the people are primitive and resemble that of earlier societal establishments. Comparing this book to actual Viking history is a bit of a stretch. While yes, there are definite parallels, its not like a historical fiction, where the lifestyles are described in depth and widely developed.

Three tribes or people groups are identified: the Aska, Riki, and Herja. Little information is given about the Herja, where they live, their motivations, etc., except for their cruel practices and human sacrifices they perform to their god (which remains unnamed.)

“What had started as a quarrel between the gods turned into the hunger for revenge–a blood feud. Every five years, we lost those we loved. And we spent the next five years counting the days to the moment we could make the Riki pay for our pain.”

The Aska and Riki both worship a different god. Sigr, the god of the Aska, is known as the god of the fjord. In Old Norse translations, Sigr means “victory” but shares no resemblance to any actual Norse gods.

“She’d tell the story of the Riki god Thora, who erupted from the mountain in fire and the flames that had come down to the fjord. Sigr had risen up from the sea to protect his people and every five years, we went back to battle to defend his honor, bound by the blood feud between us.”

Likewise, Thora, the god of the Riki, isn’t well defined. While it’s said that she “erupted from a mountain in fire,” it is unclear whether she is god of volcanoes, mountains, or even thunder? Thora is the female counterpart to Thor, the god of thunder in Norse mythology. However, it’s unclear what she is supposed to represent here. More information on these details would have really helped with boosting the fantasy aspect of the story, as it remained rather lacking in the department.

Both the Aska and the Riki have the same structural beliefs. When they die, they believe they travel to a heaven-like realm, referred to as Hylli (meaning “favor” in Old Norse), or Solbjørg (meaning “house of salvation” in Old Norse) depending on which tribe one was a part of. Once there, the dead are reunited with loved ones that had passed on before them. I’m mentioning this because it too, plays a large role in the plot. Eelyn, believing her brother Iri to be dead along with their mother, looks towards the day when they will be reunited. She and her father pray to idols of the two so that their souls may find their way in the afterlife. Death, in general, is a common occurrence within these tribes, as they are pit against one another every five years.

Pacing & Readability

I found Sky in the Deep easy to read. Moderately paced, the characters guide the reader through a shorter text, making the passage of time seem fluid and effortless.

Point-Of-View & Characters

The story is told from the perspective of Eelyn, the main character. This strong seventeen-year-old has grown up training for, and knowing battle. Understanding at a young age that life is tough, she’s adapted to understand and accept tragedy when it befalls her. Though, it doesn’t make it any less easy. After losing both her mother and older brother in clan wars and raids, she holds dear to her father and best friend Myra. However, when confronted by the ghost of her dead brother, she begins to second guess herself and everything that she believes she knows.

“I tried to remember who I was. Strong. Brave. Fierce. Sure. I tried to summon her to me–that Eelyn who would choose her people over anything else. I searched for her within myself, but she was different now. I was different. And it was something that was already done. Something I couldn’t change.”

Myra, Eelyn’s best friend and “sister” lost majority of her family at a young age. Because of that, her and Eelyn understand each other well. The two share a strong bond, and exemplify a beautiful image of friendship with how they support one another.

Both Iri and Fiske felt like similar characters. While they obviously played different roles, they didn’t feel as significant as they should have. I felt that their characters were underwhelming and underdeveloped. Similar to Eelyn and Myra’s friendship, I did appreciate how they too, represented a deep friendship and “brotherhood” together.

The main antagonists are the Riki (towards the beginning) and Herja clans to the Askas. To Eelyn, her own perspective and discriminations are also antagonists.

Major Themes

⇒ Betrayal

“Feeling that lighting strike in my soul. That Iri was alive. And not just alive. He’d betrayed us. All of us. The boy I’d shared my childhood with. The boy I’d fought side by side with. He was worse than any enemy. And the blood we shared was now poison in my veins.”

Betrayal is by far the biggest theme throughout Sky in the Deep. Believing her brother dead, Eelyn is dumbfounded when she comes across what she thought was her deceased brother on the battlefield. When she realizes that he’s fighting for the enemy tribe, the Riki, she follows him, but is captured and taken to be a slave with the Riki.

Not knowing how to handle his betrayal, Eelyn works through a series of emotions, trying to understand how he could do such a thing. Which leads into the next theme.

⇒ Survival/Death

Survival is the primary focus of everyone in this story. Life is harsh, battles are frequent, and the threat of the ruthless Herja constantly plague the minds of the characters.

Five years prior, Iri was thought to have been killed on the battlefield by the Riki. His body was found, but left. When the Riki returned to bring one of their own home for burial, they found both he and Iri were still alive. The Riki insisted that he be brought back and cared for, and he eventually was adopted into the clan. There, he found love, which became his reason for not returning to the Aska. Love, and the fact that his family probably wouldn’t take him back if he has returned after converting to following the foreign God, Thora, kept him with the Riki. Learning how accept where Iri now is, as well as her shameful status as a slave to the Riki, leads directly into the next theme.

⇒ Redemption

”We find things, just as we lose things, Eelyn. If you’ve lost your honor, you’ll find it again.”

For the Aska, it’s literally damning to become a slave. Once one assumed the title, they were no longer able to traverse the afterlife to be with their family after they pass away. When the Riki made Eelyn into one, she became immensely ashamed of her position. Also fearful to return to the Aska to expose the shame onto her father, Eelyn contemplated on returned at all.

It was during this time that she realized why Iri never returned to the Aska. His position, too, would bring shame to his family. It took Eelyn to experience a similar situation herself before she could understand her brother’s “betrayal” and the truth behind it. Not only that, she had to confront her own prejudices against the Riki in order to convince them and the Aska to fight together against the Herja.

⇒ Equality

While there is some credit to give in this area, I also want to point out a few things. Sky in the Deep has been highly esteemed among Young Adult readers for its strong female lead and the “equality” shown between men and women. However, slavery is very much a part of daily life in these tribes, and the fact that Eelyn is nearly raped, I fail to see this equality. If everyone wants to get caught up only in the fact that women fight alongside men in battle instead of being sheltered from it, I think they are missing the bigger picture.

While Viking women were known for their grit, life for a women during that period was also very difficult. Just because they were active warriors for their people didn’t eliminate all threats from others. Again, Eelyn is nearly raped…what does that say about “equality?” It shows that not everyone had the same definition of the word. I also think that because of Eelyn’s position–being the sister to Iri, and a love interest to Fiske–saved her from subjugation to treatment that otherwise would have been dealt to her when she was enslaved. Personally, I don’t think the theme of equality between men and women is actually portrayed as strongly in this story as people may think.

Overall Feelings

Things that I liked:

⇒ The themes and messages.
⇒ The origins for the tale.
⇒ There’s no swearing!
⇒ Even though it wasn’t well defined, I liked the setting and atmosphere that this story took place in.
⇒ Again, although it wasn’t focused deeply upon, I liked the culture this was set in. It stood out as its rather unique in this aspect.

Things that I didn’t like:

⇒ The overall lack of the appearance of fantasy. It read as a historical fiction with a few twists. But personally, I didn’t think it fit well into the fantasy genre.
⇒ The gore and torture scenes.
⇒ Incompleteness in some aspects of the world-building.

Overall, I thought this was a good read. While I had some issues with the world-building feeling incomplete, I appreciated Eelyn’s character and watching the transformation she went through. Sky In The Dark has strong messages about redemption, and setting aside differences in order to work together.

Vulgarity: None!
Sexual content: Mainly kissing. There is a scene where a Riki character nearly tries to rape Eelyn. There is also reference towards Eelyn and another character having sexual relations.
Violence: Quite a bit, including some gore and torture scenes.

View all my reviews

1. What inspired SKY IN THE DEEP? How did the idea and Eelyn come to you? Do you have any
favorite Viking stories?

The sibling betrayal was definitely the first inspiration for this story. I was driving in the pouring rain on
this country road and that first scene just hit me – Eelyn, seeing her brother on the battlefield after
thinking that he was dead for five years. I pulled over on the side of the road and scribbled a million
notes on an old envelope. I was immediately hooked to the idea and I wanted to know what had
happened. I started writing that first chapter and I just never stopped.

2. What type of research did you do for your characters and world-building? What languages did
you study to implement the languages that the Aska and the Riki speak? What was the strangest
thing you had to research for this book?

I did a ton of research for this story. I actually really love to research things so it was a lot of fun. A lot of
it was stuff like clothing, landscape, weapons, food, etc. But I did a lot of research into Norse mythology
as well to build a foundation for this world. The language used is Old Norse, but it’s a dead language so
studying it was really difficult. There is a lot of controversy about it among scholars and there’s no real
way to fully understand it, so I just did my best based on my own investigation. I’m definitely not an
expert! The weirdest thing I had to research was how to tear out someone’s eyeball. Yuck.

3. What was your writing process like for SKY IN THE DEEP?

Complete and utter obsession. When I draft, I get really buried in the world and I don’t really come up
for air until I get to the end. I write as much as I can and limit my intake of other influencers that could
mess with my mindset. I don’t watch TV or movies or listen to music that’s not on my playlist, and I kind
of don’t have a social life until it’s done.

4. What was your hardest scene to write? What was the easiest?

I really didn’t struggle to get this story on the page the way I have with other books so I really don’t
know what the hardest scene to write was. But the easiest was the first chapter. I wrote it so fast and it
just clicked in so perfectly.

5. Which of your characters are you the most like? Who was your favorite to write?

Eelyn! We have so much in common and she really inspires me. But I think Halvard was the most fun to
write. I really, really love him.

6. Do you have a soundtrack for SKY IN THE DEEP? Can you share a couple songs? What would
Eelyn’s favorite song be?

Yes! Music plays a HUGE role in my writing process and I have a playlist for every project. The ones I
probably listened to the most while drafting SKY are To the Hills by Laurel, Bare by Wildes, and Rise Up –
Reprise by Foxes. But a link to the whole playlist is on my site!

7. What books have inspired you to write? What books are you looking forward to reading this
year?

The ones that inspired me to write are nothing like my books. One of the most influential ones for me was A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, because the human element is so beautiful and the author explores so many things in that book that really took my breath away. I wanted to write stories that went deep like that, but I love fantasy so I try to it within that realm.

8. Any advice on querying? Or writing advice for aspiring writers?

Querying – do not just sign with any agent who will take you. Make a dream agent list of qualified agents
who have good reputations and make consistent sales. Query them. If they don’t bite, then write
another book that they might want. Believe me when I say it is worth waiting for the right agent!


9. Any details about the companion novel?


I can’t say anything about the companion novel yet! But I’m hoping that we can start talking about it
soon because I am really excited about it!

Adrienne Young

Adrienne Young is a born and bred Texan turned California girl. She is a foodie with a deep love of history and travel and a shameless addiction to coffee. When she’s not writing, you can find her on her yoga mat, scouring antique fairs for old books, sipping wine over long dinners, or disappearing into her favorite art museums. She lives with her documentary filmmaker husband and their four little wildlings beneath the West Coast sun.

eARC Review: Ace Of Shades by Amanda Foody

eARC Review: Ace Of Shades by Amanda Foody

Welcome to the City of Sin, where casino families reign, gangs infest the streets… and secrets hide in every shadow. Partial synopsis provided by Goodreads. Ace Of Shades Series: The Shadow Game #1Author: Amanda FoodyPublication Date: April 10, 2018Publisher: Harlequin TeenPage Count: 416Format: eARCGenre: Young […]

Cover Reveals for The Garden of Ash & Cursed: The Hunter Inside!

Cover Reveals for The Garden of Ash & Cursed: The Hunter Inside!

Garden of Ashes (Snow SPark Saga #2) PUBLISHER: PARLIAMENT HOUSE PRESS Synopsis It’s the one place no rustler ever wants to end up. Having survived Rondo’s destruction, sixteen-year- old Rags has been taken captive by the Kingdom and sentenced to ‘rehabilitation’ at the Kingdom’s Threshing […]

March Wrap-Up

March Wrap-Up

I'm a bit late to the game getting this post up.

To be honest, I was trying to figure out how I want to go forward with monthly wrap-ups. I was doing separate posts for each reading challenge and…it was becoming redundant and tedious. So, I’ve decided to simply combine everything into a one-stop wrap-up post (I won’t be including my upcoming ARCs for the month, however, because I prefer to keep those separate.) 

Hopefully it’s more streamline for folks who like to read recap posts instead of getting chunks here and there with material which is perhaps stated more than once.

What I Read & Reviewed

What I Read But Still Need To Review

  • A School for Dragons by Amy Wolfe (tentative 3.5 stars)
  • Children of Icarus by Caighlan Smith (review was posted April 3rd)

Catch-Up Reviews Written

Top 5 Wednesday Meme

Thursday Blog Trot Meme / Around the Blogosphere

Fairy Tale Friday Meme

Other Noteable Posts

Beat the Backlist Reading Challenge

This past month, I was able to contribute a total of 41 points for Story Sorcerers (mostly with review points.) 

As I said in my last Beat the Backlist post, I’m no longer pledging which books I will be reading for the challenge because I simply have too many ARCs and challenges going on to stay that precise with my reading choices. 

Popsugar Challenge

I accomplished…ABSOLUTELY NOTHING for this challenge! *Yay me!* This next month, I should have some prompts that I’ll be able to check off. So far, I’ve completed 4/40 prompts.

Goodreads Reading Challenge

My Goodreads Reading Challenge is going alright this year. I’m definitely behind, but I think I’ll be able to stay mostly on track. I knew going into it that 200 books in one year is ambitious, but I still think I can get there.

I hope…

#ARCsAnonymous Goodreads Group Challenge

The #ARCsAnonymous Goodreads Group headed by AvalinahsBooks is sort of an offshoot for the State of the ARC Meme she also created. This past month’s ARC reading prompt was Young Adult. I was able to accrue 175 points for the month, which has been probably one of my lowest scores yet. 

Anddd that's it!
How did March go for you?
Are you staying on top of your goals, or failing like me? 😛 (I hope not, for your sake.)

Fairy Tale Friday #5: The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio) by Carlo Collodi

Fairy Tale Friday #5: The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio) by Carlo Collodi

The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le Avventure Di Pinocchio) By Carlo Collodi The Adventures of Pinocchio, originally titled Le Avventure Di Pinocchio was written by Carlo Lorenzini, better known by his pen name of Carlo Collodi. Carlo was an Italian author, who liked writing about characters […]

eARC Review: Bacon Pie by Candace Robinson & Gerardo Delgadillo and Author Interview with Candace Robinson!

eARC Review: Bacon Pie by Candace Robinson & Gerardo Delgadillo and Author Interview with Candace Robinson!

Release day April 13, 2018! When a showdown between Lia and Kiev lands them in the principal’s office, they’re forced into volunteer work at the cringe-worthy Piggy Palooza Festival, or risk being suspended. Lia and Kiev aren’t thrilled about the situation, especially when it interferes […]

Thursday Blog Trot #8

Thursday Blog Trot #8

Happy Thursday, everyone!

Here we are again. There are some great posts to check out this week, from self-care guides for book bloggers to book review tips!

Thursday Blog Trot is a weekly meme dedicated to passing along great information provided by bloggers from all over the world. If you like the sounds of this Thursday Blog Trot Meme, feel free to use it, along with the image provided! Be sure to comment below if you do!

 

1-Star Ratings

Kristen at Metaphors & Moonlight poses some interesting thoughts about why she rarely, if ever, gives 1-star ratings for books. Giving 1-star ratings is hard…and can also be confusing to determine exactly why one is being given. Personally, I’ve given few 1-star ratings, and can relate to a lot that Kristen says about her process when a single star book lands in her lap. Check it out here!

Reviewing Books

Amy from The Little Book Nerds in the Corner co-wrote a post with Heather from The Frozen Book Blog about how they write their reviews. While everyone certainly has their own way of doing so, reading about how others writes their reviews can help streamline writing your own!

A Book Lover That Doesn't Buy Books?

I know, it’s sort of unheard of in the book-o-sphere. A book blogger and reviewer that doesn’t (really) buy books!? Although, I don’t buy a bunch of books either. In her discussion post, Vee at Vee Reading shares why she doesn’t buy many books. Personally, I believe her reasons have a lot of merit and wisdom behind them. Thanks for sharing, Vee!

Book Blogger Self Care

When I came across this guest post on NovelKnight by Lili from Utopia State of Mind, it really resonated with me. 

The past two months, I’ve really been feeling the heat with blogging and staying on top of everything. The truth is, my second child will be arriving in less than two months, and I physically, mentally, and emotionally can’t handle all the stress that blogging, and life in general brings as I normally do. Yeah, I feel a bit like a failure. (I may write a separate post on this later.) But this post really helped me re-evaluate my thinking. 

I think this is something every book blogger should read and take into consideration with their blogging and overall life!

Twitter Hashtags

I actually came across this post via a “share” post that Dani from Perspective Of A Writer put together.  (Thanks for sharing, Dani! Or else I probably wouldn’t have found this!) Carrie from Cat on a Bookshelf put together a guide of Twitter hashtags for book bloggers! Yes, you read that right! Check out this very helpful post, here!

I HOPE YOU FIND THESE GREAT POSTS HELPFUL, USEFUL, AND A BIT ENTERTAINING! BE SURE TO GIVE THESE BLOGGERS SOME LOVE BY CHECKING OUT THEIR BLOGS, AND LEAVING A COMMENT OR A LIKE!


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